November 20, 2010

Don’t Listen to Them

Opinions are great, but...

We enjoy receiving validation and positive feedback, that's clear. No one likes someone who is overly negative. Keep that in mind next time someone says; “wha’dya think?”

We often seek the opinion of others simply to confirm our own.

We enjoy acceptance. Having happy customers is a good thing. Support of friends and family is important to us.

But when we begin to measure our success, or worse, our importance by the number of friends, followers, subscribers or connections we have on the social web, we can quickly lose touch with reality.

Our need to belong.

But when does that need become an obsession? Do we believe those who say they don’t pay attention to what others say about them? Can we do the same?

The outcast at school or the frustrated idea guy who has run up against the wall of executives who “don’t understand”, feel the same way. It sucks when we're not accepted. Those who walk among us with skin like a cobra fascinate me. The rest of us do care what people think despite our weak protests to the contrary.

Imagine if it was really that easy to be a renegade with blinders to others and blaze our own path. Let’s go for it.
Who cares what they say, we’re not gonna listen to them!


This is not about being arrogant. Leadership does actually require a team. We won't walk on people and we are certainly not better than anyone else. We are simply going to stop asking for approval on our ideas and start leading the charge toward what drives us. And in that world, numbers are obsolete.

We are simply following Dr. Seuss’ timeless advice; “Be who you are and say what you feel because those who mind don't matter and those who matter don't mind.”

Sound like a plan? You in?

knealemann | email



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image credit: dr. seuss | cashprior
 
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