August 26, 2016

Someday

I have literally lost count how many times I've heard a phrase that begins with the words; "Some day I'm going to..." Do we mean it or are we stalling? If you want to write some day, start writing today. If you want a new job, start looking today. If you want to leave that relationship, leave it today.

Easier said that done? That's one excuse. But if you look back at your life, how often when you've taken that action have you've said you should have done it earlier? Are we afraid to make the changes, moves, shifts, in our lives or are we more happy to complain about not making them?

Change is hard; doing nothing is harder

In the last two years, I have sold a house, moved twice, shifted my consulting business to a full-time roll at an agency, reconnected with some great friends, and I often think it was easier than I feared it would be while I stayed stuck for far too many years. You know what you want. It may take time, more money, some additional training,

I don't write that from some perfect perch above fear, I have lost count the things I've "meant to" or "wanted to" do; we all have that list. The key question is whether we're going to take those items off the list or actually do them. Because we could keep nestled in the safety of "some day I'm going to..." or take the shot.

It's irrelevant without one critical ingredient – action

Try this. Put your entire focus on that one single thing. Now make only one decision; whether you are prepared to do what it takes to accomplish it, or accept you don't really have the desire.

The late Jim Rohn had a great phrase I remind myself often - especially in those moments when I'm lying to myself about some day I'm going to - and that is; if you want something bad enough, you'll find a way; if not, you'll find an excuse.

Let's find a way.
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