August 10, 2015

Where Do We Start?

I was on three calls last week with company leaders who asked the same question. All three are running successful businesses but realize changes and refinements are necessary but admit they’re too close to see the forest or the trees. My years of  self-employment and as a corporate leader help me during these chats because I know exactly what they’re experiencing. I have been there. You don’t know what to do next or how you will move forward on a project or prospect.

Whether it’s a job, running a company, or a personal relationship, we do get too close to our own stuff. There comes a time in every situation when we have to step back a bit and gain some perspective. My friend and colleague Mitch Joel says he takes offense when people say; “Don’t take it personally, it’s business” as he takes his business very personally. He runs a successful agency that employs a lot of people who have to feed their families and support themselves. I agree with him.

Step Back Before Stepping Forward

I’m lucky to have some great close friends and we share deeply personal stuff, fears, hopes, plans, and concerns. The conservations aren’t always neat and tidy and figured out. And that’s a good thing. We all need safe places to share our fears and work it out with someone who can see things from a few steps back.

I am a big fan of think days. Give your team a day a month where they work but they don’t come into the office. This isn’t a “working from home” day; it’s a day to think and plan and breathe and gain a bit of perspective. We need to do that in our relationships as well. Perhaps the question isn't where do we start but something more critical.

When do we breathe?
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Kneale Mann | People + Priority = Profit
 
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